Other Union Pacific Menus

Menus shown here include non-color wrap-around photo menus that mostly date from before 1947; menus with Howard Fogg paintings commissioned by the UP for the 1969 Golden Spike centennial; children’s menus; and menus for special meals or occasions. I’ve divided these menus into several groups or series with a name based on the menus’ design themes. Click on an image to download a PDF of that menu. Click on the brief description below to go to the page describing that menu.

Art Nouveau Series

These menus were used from the late 1920s to 1935. The early ones feature photos printed using the lithographic process, sometimes called “hand-colored.” Later ones use “natural color” photos. The photos and text are surrounded by a busy border in an art nouveau style. Curiously, the Bryce and Zion menus come in at least three slightly different versions even though most are clearly based photos taken from nearly the same spot. Along with the menus shown here, the only other one I’ve identified shows the Grand Canyon from Grand Canyon Lodge.


1927 Menu

1928 Menu

1929 Menu

1929 Menu

1929 Menu

1929 Menu

1929 Menu

1929 Menu

1930 Menu

1930 Menu

1930 Menu

1934 Menu

1934 Menu

1934 Menu

1935 Menu

1935 Menu

Moderne Series

In 1935, the railroad simplified its menus with a white background and a few stripes, but still using the same photos and text as in the Art Nouveau series. I originally called this the Modern series, but Moderne is more appropriate. Moderne “is almost the exact opposite” of Modern, another web site observes. “‘Modern’ design values only the functional and eschews all ornament; moderne design insists that the functional must be made artistic before it can show its face in public.” In addition to the three menus shown here, I’ve identified ones with Mount Rainier and the Great White Throne.


1935 Menu

1935 Menu

1935 Menu

Black-and-White Series

The Modern series lasted less than a year, as UP introduced a series with black-and-white photos of parks and other sights in 1936. Instead of photos that wrapped around the menu, these used two different photos on the front and back covers. In addition to the menus shown here, I’ve identified ones showing Old Faithful and Yosemite Valley.


1939 Menu

1940 Menu

1940 Menu

1941 Menu

1941 Menu

1945 Menu

Premiere Series

In the 1930s, UP designed specific menus for each of its premiere heavyweight trains including the Los Angeles Limited, Overland Limited, Portland Rose, Columbine, and Pony Express. Early in the history of these menus, the premiere status of these trains was displaced by the streamliners, but the streamliners initially did not go every day. By 1949 or so, UP was using color wraparound menus on these trains.


1939 Menu

1939 Menu

1942 Menu

1942 Menu

1943 Menu

1946 Menu

1946 Menu

1948 Menu

Streamliner Series

The first streamliners used menus with the Winged Streamliner logo on the front. Although these were largely replaced by the color wraparound menus in 1947, I’ve seen a couple of City of San Francisco streamliner menus dated 1964.


1946 Menu

1946 Menu

1946 Menu

Lodge Menus

These menus were used in Union Pacific lodges and hotels. Some lodges also used color wraparound menus.


1936 Menu

1953 Menu

1953 Menu

1955 Menu

1961 Menu

1961 Menu

Children’s Menus

Union Pacific appears to have had three children’s menus before the war (bear, rabbit, and squirrel) and three after the war (bear, deer, and cowboy).


1930 Menu

1930 Menu

1930 Menu

1933 Menu

1950 Menu

1957 Menu

1964 Menu

1965 Menu

1969 Menu

Centennial Series

UP commissioned famous railroad painter Howard Fogg to do sixteen paintings to commemorate the centennial of the last spike. UP used six of these paintings on lunch and dinner menu folders and the same six on breakfast, lunch, and coffee shop car menu cards.


1969 Menu

1969 Menu

1969 Menu

1970 Menu

1970 Menu

1971 Menu

1971 Menu

1971 Menu

Special Menus

This is a catch-all category that includes a cute beverage menu, one of a series of World War II menus, a Chef’s Salad menu that was used on UP passenger trains for many years, Christmas menus, and menus used on special trains after UP ceased to operate passenger trains. Two others I’ve identified in the World War II series depict Red Cross volunteers packaging bandages and a farm worker picking “vitamins for victory.”


1936 Menu

1946 Menu

1964 Menu

1964 Menu

1970 Menu

1971 Menu

1974 Menu

1979 Menu